Classes G-H


GERMAN:INTERMEDIATE   James Gilmour email: [email protected] 
Tue 12.50 – 13.55 (Room 1.33)
For those wishing to build on their previous knowledge.  We will concentrate on spoken German plus some grammar.  No book is necessary – James says it is all in his head.

GERMAN: ADVANCED CONVERSATION Christel Clare
Wed 15.10 – 16.15 (Room 1.30)
For advanced enthusiasts.  Advanced language and conversation.

GNOSTICISM George Wood
Thur 12.50 – 13.55 (Room 1.33)                             The Inward Journey from Insight to Gnosis. The world we live in is constantly changing – subject to growth, decay and  death. Nothing is certain or lasting; possessions, health and happiness – everything passes away. Life is characterized in our world by birth and death, day and night, war and peace. It is called the dialectical world, containing the seeds of its own destruction. Nothing has eternal life, not even the most sublime thing imaginable.  Many people merely chase shadows; such is the tragedy of it all.  So, if one accepts that this world of visible matter is a world of delusion, can one still look for the fulfilment of one’s primordial yearning?  Through discussion and dialogue, this course will address these issues.

GREEK: CLASSICAL FOR POST BEGINNERS  Geoff Heath
Mon 15.10 – 16.15 (Room 1.28)
We will continue reading various Greek texts chosen by the class. This is not a course for beginners.

GREEK: CLASSICAL ADVANCED  Argyros Arghyrou
email: [email protected]
Tue 10.30 – 11.35 (Room 1.26)

A discussion class centred on classical Greek and philosophy.  The books we use are Beyond GCSE and Plato (Loeb Classical Library).

GREEK: MODERN CONVERSATION Sue Blake
Wed 11.40 – 12.45 (Room 1.26)
Fortnightly on Oct 2, 16, 30; Nov 13, 27; Dec 11. Jan 22; Feb 5, 19; Mar 4, 18; Apr 1; May 6, 20; June 3, 17; July 1, 15. 

Informal practice at speaking modern Greek for enthusiastic intermediates who are not fluent (led by one who is also not fluent

HEBREW CONVERSATION  Jeff Freeman and Gila Wacholder
Wed 10.30 – 11.35 (Room 1.28)
Fortnightly on Oct 2, 16, 30; Nov 13, 27; Dec 11. Jan 22; Feb 5,19; Mar 4, 18; Apr 1; May 6, 20; June 3, 17; July 1, 15.

This course is for people with some knowledge of  Ivrit who want to improve their conversational skills in a friendly environment. Chosen topics are discussed each time.  This is a really fun experience where people forget that they are speaking a foreign language.

HEBREW: POST BEGINNERS Margaret Myers
email: [email protected]
Tue 12.50 – 13.55 (Room 2.26) N.B. starts late, on 29 October. 

This class is for  participants who have attended the beginners’ class for one year.  Members are encouraged to speak from the very first session.  Material will be provided.

HEBREW: BETTER THAN BEGINNERS Margaret Myers
Tue 14.00 – 15.05 (Room 2.26) N.B. starts late – on 29 October.
Attendees at this class can read, write script and (hopefully) have a vocabulary of 200 – 500 words. If you think you will fit in, you will be very welcome. Material for the sessions is provided week.

HEBREW: INTERMEDIATE Margaret Myers
Tue 10.30 – 11.35 (Room 2.26)   N.B. starts late – on 29 October./em>                                                                This class consists of members who have been coming regularly for several years – and some who have lived in Israel many years ago. Speaking is still an effort but is encouraged by all present. We practise speaking and reading, both exercises in grammar and extracts from the Gesher easy reading series. Material is provided weekly. You are welcome to make a trial visit.

HEBREW LITERATURE  Esther Shouby
Wed 14.00 – 15.05) (Room 1.28) Fortnightly on Oct 2, 16, 30; Nov 13, 27; Dec 11. Jan 22; Feb 5, 19; Mar 4, 18; Apr 1; May 6, 20; June 3, 17; July 1, 15.
We will be reading poems, short stories and novels in Hebrew and as English translations –  the discussion will be in English.

HISTORY TALKS AT THE PETER SAMUEL HALL

THE FALL OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE Thomas Harris
Royal Free Hospital Mon 11.35 – 12.35, Autumn Term only.
It took over three centuries to build; and essentially three decades to demolish.The British Empire was the greatest the world has ever seen and still has a major influence on today’s Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Pacific and Caribbean.  This series of talks will discuss why   British rule overseas came to an end and how that process differed from the decline of the other European colonial empires. It will focus on some less well known experiences of decolonisation.

EUROPEAN HISTORY  Christopher Dean
Royal Free Hospital Mon 11.35 – 12.35, Spring and part of Summer Term. 
Germany, from the Reformation to Hitler. Germany’s fluid frontiers; its religious divisions; baroque Germany; the rise of absolutism and the modern state in the Holy Roman Empire; the Enlightenment, revolution and war; from Biedermeier to Bismarck and on to 1933.

HISTORY OF INFECTION:     Robin Weiss
Royal Free Hospital, Mon 11.35 – 12.35 Rest of Summer Term.                                
The germ’s eye view.  Infectious diseases have been a major cause of human mortality since ancient times from the Black Death to Spanish Flu.  We discuss their origins, how they spread across the world through globalisation and affected society. We shall be                covering 1) Globalisation of infection;  2) Two Gentlemen of Verona: syphilis and cervical cancer; 3) Out of Africa: the origin of AIDS, Ebola and Zika; and finally 4) Vaccines: weapons of mass protection in an age of increasing microbial resistance to treatment.

HISTORY OF EUROPE       Ken Baldry
Wed 11.40 – 12.45 (Room 2.21)
This year we will cover from the 5th century at Byzantium to the 14th century in France with over 3400 slides and some musical examples.

HISTORY:EXPANSIVE HISTORY OF EUROPEAN OPERA  (SEE UNDER MUSIC) 
Howard Shelter
Mondays and Tuesdays
Careers:  Successes, Failures, Patrons, Critics, Censors. Real Life: Tragedies, Wars, Revolutions, Politics. Operas: Historical Development, Opera Plots, Music, Libretti Translations.

 HISTORY:  THE JEWS OF SPAIN
Tiki Martell
Tues 15.10 – 16.15 (Room 2.26)
According to tradition, Jews migrated to the Iberian peninsula in the time of the 2nd Temple. The crucially important period from the 10th to the 12th century paved the road to ‘The Golden Age’ of Judaism, Islam and later ironically, to Anti-Semitism.  It also contributed to 18th and 19th century art, philosophy and the history that made Unesco  declare Flamenco a ‘World Heritage Treasure’ in 2016.

HISTORY: MAKING AMERICA Deirdre Krymer
Tue 12.50 – 13.55 (Room 1.22)  Spring and Summer Terms only.Fortnightly on Apr 28; May 12, 26; June 9,23; July 7. 
The United States has always believed in its ‘exceptionalism’, a new society distinct from the old world left behind in Europe, based on immigration bound together by the American Constitution.  Its development included conflicts over slavery and civil rights, the rise of consumerism, phenomenal economic growth, and territorial expansion rising to world dominance.  The 21st century poses new challenges to its role in the world and the rise of new populism at home.

HISTORY: MEDIEVAL HISTORY  New Margaret Jackson Roberts
Thur 10.30 – 11.35 (Room 30) </em
Exploring the Middle Ages.  The course aims to consider various  aspects of medieval history, mainly in England and Western Europe, and  to provide a tour d’horizon of some particular themes.  We can consider in more depth any points of special interest to those                    attending.

HYPNOTHERAPY  Adeline Kam   email: [email protected]
Tue 14.00 – 15.05 (Room 1.30)Hypnosis for relaxation and well being.
Learn how to relax, how hypnosis began, the power of your mind and how you can use it to your advantage, The class usually starts with relaxation and may end with relaxation too.  It’s a fun, interactive class. See you there!