Classes R-S


RUSSIAN Silva Rubashova
Mon 10.30 –12.30 (Room 30)
We are a friendly group, enjoying lively Russian conversation, reading and translation at a fairly ambitious advanced level.

RUSSIAN FOR NEAR BEGINNERS Sheila Rockett
Mon 12.30 – 13.30 (Room 28)
This is not a class for beginners, but for those who have a reasonable knowledge of the Cyrillic alphabet and of basic Russian grammar, with simple phrases for greeting, asking directions etc. We will continue to use the New Penguin Russian Course (N J Brown) supplemented by other material supplied by the co-ordinator.

RUSSIAN: IMPROVERS Sheila Rockett & Luda Drewitt
Mon 10.20 – 11.30 (Room 28)
A continuation of last year’s course, with an opportunity of conversation with a native Russian speaker. We will pursue a deeper exploration of the language and beginning the appreciation of Russian texts such as plays, provided by the co-ordinators.

RUSSIAN CONVERSATION AND GRAMMAR Sheila Rockett & Luda Drewitt
Mon 11.30 – 12.30 (Room 28)
A continuation of the previous class, explaining specific questions about Russian Grammar, with colloquial conversation led by Luda, our native Russian speaker.

RUSSIAN CONVERSATION Luda Drewitt
Thur 15.00 – 16.05 (Room 28)
Simple friendly Russian conversation class for those who have done the beginners’ class or who are at a similar standard.

SCIENCE: ASTRONOMY New David Ellis
Wed 13.50 – 14.55 (Room 29) Autumn term only. Fortnightly on Oct 4, 18; Nov 1, 15, 29; Dec 13.
A journey to explore the stars. You will be guided through our solar system and its key features, then on to a nearby solar system like Alpha Centauri and the new exo-planets around the binary star, Proxima Centauri. Next we go on a journey to the Milky Way with its stars and nebulae, discovering what they are. Then to nearby galaxies, clusters and supernovae with a look at current space technology and probes.

SCIENCE: GENETIC MODIFICATION New Michael Black
Tue 12.40 – 13.45 (Room 22) Summer Term only
Genetic modification: how to do it. What has it been used for? What might it be used for? Is it bad for the environment? Is it bad for our health? What should we make of it?

SCIENCE: HISTORIES AND USES OF EPIDEMICS New Tony Dayan
Thur 10.20 – 11.25 (Room 24) Spring Term only, fortnightly Jan 18; Feb 1, 15; Mar 1, 15.
There have been many epidemics resulting in huge losses of people, food and even of empires, e.g. Black Death, ‘Flu in 1919-21 and Foot and Mouth Disease. We shall consider the principal epidemic diseases and their medical and societal consequences as major factors moulding civilisations in the past and still a threat tomorrow.

SCIENCE: HISTORY OF ELECTRICITY Amalia Michaels
Tue 12.40 – 13.45 (Room 29) Autumn and Spring Terms, fortnightly on Sept 26; Oct 10, 24; Nov 7, 21; Dec 5. Jan 9, 23; Feb 6, 20; Mar 6, 20.
When Thales of Miletus (or was it Mrs Thales?) discovered the properties of amber (electron, or  in Greek), little did he know that no further useful work would be done in that area for over 2,000 years. And yet the discoveries made since then have completely revolutionised our lives. Learn how it all happened and about the people who made it happen.

SCIENCE: A HISTORY OF ENERGY, PAST, PRESENT….. Alan Morton
Thur 10.20- 11.25 (Room 24) Autumn and Spring Term only. Fortnightly on Sept 28; Oct 12, 26; Nov 9, 23; Dec 7. Jan 11, 25; Feb 8, 22; Mar 8, 22.
..and Future? Human society depends on energy, from wind, water, and wood of earliest times to the fossil fuels of today. This course covers the development of industrial society, looking at the changes in technology, from steam engines and power stations burning coal to transport using oil. With human activity changing the climate, what are the possibilities for our grandchildren?

SCIENCE AND HISTORY OF FOOD Michael Spiro
Tue 12.40 – 13.45 (Room 29) Autumn term only. Fortnightly on Oct 3, 17; 31; Nov 14, 28; Dec 12.
This course will discuss important aspects of food and food science and how different foods have affected human history and health.

SCRABBLE A
Mon 10.00 – 11.25 (Room 24)
Ann Lucas & Mary Firth
AND
SCRABBLE B
Mon 15.10 – 16.15 (Room 24)
Jenny Bartlett
Come along and play a friendly game. Knowledge of the rules and some experience of Scrabble are required.

SELF DEVELOPMENT Barry Rae
Tue 11.30 – 12.35 (Room 29) Summer term only.
A Life-long Challenge We concentrate on building self esteem and self confidence, becoming good problem solvers, learning to behave assertively, feeling positive about ourselves, recognising strengths and causes and effects of aggressive and passive behaviour.

SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY Caroline White
Tue10.20 – 11.25 (Room 33)
N.B. In Spring term, class begins late – on 6 February

Social Anthropology is about much more than ‘other cultures’. In this course we will cover such ‘traditional’ topics as Kinship and Marriage, Dowry and Bridewealth, Leadership in Small Scale Societies and Survival in Hunter Gatherer Societies. However, we will also be looking at the impact on small scale societies of increasing involvement with the West. What was the effect of iron implements on stone-tool using people? How did Christian missionaries influence people’s lives? How have guns transformed traditional forms of conflict control? How has growing cash crops affected diet, funerals, marriages and other traditions? To provide ‘fieldwork experience’, we will be viewing a series of films.

SPANISH: ABSOLUTE BEGINNERS Colette Lévy
Tue 12.40 – 13.45 (Room 30)
A useful level when going on holiday in everyday situations. The book we use is Pasos I, a first course in Spanish published by Hodder Arnold. An activity book and cassettes accompany the textbook and a small book of Spanish verbs is useful. For those who visit Spain, a BBC Active Spanish pocket phrase book and dictionary (author: Philippa Goodrich) would also be useful.

SPANISH: POST BEGINNERS Colette Lévy
Mon 12.50 – 13.55 (Room 33)
The book we use is Pasos II (publ. Hodder Arnold). The course is a continuation of first year studies. A small book of Spanish verbs and a BBC Active Spanish pocket phrase book and dictionary by Philippa Goodrich are useful for those who visit Spain.

SPANISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE Dori Meri
Thur 10.20 – 12.00 (Aspern Centre)
Reading and Discussion. Our aim is practice and proficiency in spoken communication. This course is for those who have done Spanish for more than one year. If you would also like to have a glimpse into Latin American and Spanish literature, please come and join us. We shall not limit ourselves to talking about your favourite authors and reading some of their work, but we shall also cover some lesser-known although equally beautiful literature.

SPANISH AND ROMANCE PHILOLOGY Anthony Gooch
Wed 11.30 – 12.35 (Room 26) Fortnightly on Oct 4, 18; Nov 1, 15, 29; Dec 13. Jan 17, 31; Feb 14, 28; Mar 14; Apr 18; May 2, 16, 30; June 13, 27; July 11.
Advanced language class. Nos centraremos esencialmente en el español, pero de vez en cuando surgirá la comparación con palabras italianas y francesas. El latín estará, por supuesto, siempre presente, y con frecuencia el griego. Y, por doquier, el árabe.

SPANISH: ADVANCED Carmen Irizarry
Wed 10.00 – 11.25 (Room 33). Fortnightly on Oct 4, 18; Nov 1, 15, 29; Dec 13. Jan 17, 31; Feb 14, 28; Mar 14; Apr 18; May 2, 16, 30; June 13, 27; July 11.
The week in Spain. A review of the Spanish press over the previous fortnight, with selected articles on domestic and international topics, the arts, opinion pieces and reportage for discussion in Spanish. Students may bring their own contributions from the London papers to complement our debate on la actualidad angloespañola.