Courses G – H

Ralf lecturing close up - Copy

GERMAN: BEGINNERS Christel Clare
Wed 13.50 – 14.55 (Annexe)
This class is for those with little or no knowledge of the language. No textbook is needed but please bring a notebook and a writing implement as Christel will be providing the material.

GERMAN: POST BEGINNERS James Gilmour
Tue 12.40 – 13.45 (Room 33)
For those wishing to build on their previous knowledge.  This class will concentrate on spoken German plus some grammar.  No book is necessary – James says it is all in his head.

GERMAN: ADVANCED CONVERSATION        Christel Clare
Wed 15.00 – 16.05 (Annexe)
For advanced enthusiasts.  Advanced language and conversation.

GNOSTICISM & ESOTERIC RELIGIOUS HISTORY, ANCIENT AND MODERN              George Wood
Thu 12:40-13:45 (Room 33)

GREEK ART & LITERATURE   Oonagh Lahr
Fri 10.45 – 12.00 (Room 28)  
As usual, we will start with three books of the Iliad and three books of the Odyssey, after which we will study a few tragedies or a tragedy and a comedy.   Also as usual, we will visit the British Museum to see the Elgin Marbles.

GREEK: CLASSICAL FOR BEGINNERS       Argyros Arghyrou
Fri 12.30 – 13.45 (Room 33) 
Second year This is a beautiful language but a very demanding subject. Constant revision is vital and regular study is the most efficient way of learning.
We shall use Greek to GCSE Part 1 by John Taylor, published  by Bristol Classical Press.
Speak to Argyros if you are not sure of your standard.

 GREEK: CLASSICAL FOR POST BEGINNERS Geoff Heath
Mon 15.10 – 16.15 (Room 30)
We will continue reading Greek texts such as Plato’s Symposium. This is not a course for beginners.

GREEK: CLASSICAL ADVANCED   Argyros Arghyrou
Tue 10.20 – 11.25 (Room 26)
If you have been attending the Beginners’ class for four years, then this is the class for you! We use Greek to GCSE, Part 2.

GREEK CONVERSATION – INFORMAL GROUP Frances Hetherington
Room 26, fortnightly, Wednesdays at 11.30, alternates with Spanish Philology; starts on 3 May.
An informal class for those who want to improve their fluency in modern Greek (led by someone who is not very fluent).

HEBREW: ABSOLUTE BEGINNERS Margaret Myers
Tue 13.50 – 14.55 (Room 30)
Even if you can’t say a single word in Hebrew then this is the class for you.  We are a friendly group who like helping each other and we’d love you to join us. There are no classes during October.

HEBREW: IMPROVERS Margaret Myers
Tue 10.20 – 11.25 (Annexe)
This is a follow-up class from Hebrew for Beginners. There are no classes during October.

HEBREW: INTERMEDIATE Margaret Myers
Tue 11.30 – 12.35 (Annexe)
For those with some knowledge of Hebrew who would like to further improve their skills in the language.  Material will be provided. There are no classes in October.

HEBREW (MODERN): MORE ADVANCED Bari Fischman
Thur 13.00 – 14.30 (Room 30)
ם  ו ל ש  New members are welcome to our informal friendly group which is open not only  to men who were barmitzvah long ago – and women who never were –  but you don’t even have to be Jewish!  Reading stories; writing letters; conversation to help with your next visit to Israel.  Enjoy improving along with us.

HEBREW CONVERSATION Gila Wacholder
Wed 10.20 – 11.25 (Room 28)                   
Fortnightly on Sept 28; Oct 26 (not  12) ; Nov 9, 23; Dec 7. Jan 11, 25; Feb 8, 22, Mar 8, 22; Apr 26. May 10, 24; June  7, 21; July 5. 
This course is for people with some knowledge of Ivrit who would like to improve their conversational skills in a friendly environment. Topics of choice are discussed on a fortnightly basis.  This is a really fun experience where people forget that they are speaking a foreign language.

HISTORY AND IDEAS Linda Blandford
Mon 14.00 – 15,05 (Annexe) Autumn and Spring Terms only
How do we make sense of it all? How can we dig into the past to understand the present?  Philosophy, history, literature, popular culture – using all and everything to work out the questions we should be asking and investigate some answers.  Reading is optional; there is no homework.

HISTORY: PEACE AND WAR IN EUROPE  New Christopher Dean
Tue 12.40 – 13.45 (Room 2.21) Spring Term (may continue in Summer)
Episodes in international relations c.1500-1950
This course will look at a series of trends in European (including British) diplomacy, including the use of the arts in Renaissance diplomacy, causes and consequences of wars, the era of dynastic states, the impact of the Reformation, overseas empires, revolution and modern ideologies – from Henry VIII to Hitler, from Niccolò Machiavelli to the Nato alliance.

HISTORY OF EUROPE Ralph Blumenau
Mon 11.30 – 12.30 4)
(Peter Samuel Hall, Royal Free Hospital)       
From the mid 17th century to the early 19th century.

HISTORY OF THE JEWS  Ralph Blumenau
Thur 15.00 – 16.00 (Room 2.21)
From the destruction of the Second Temple in 70 CE to the period of the Crusades (11th Century CE).

HISTORY: MAKING AMERICA Deirdre Krymer
Tue 13.50 -14.55  (Room 33) Spring Term,
fortnightly on Jan 10, 24; Feb 7, 21;Mar 7, 21.
USA started out as a `new society’, believing in its own ‘exceptionalism’, apart from the old European aristocratic regimes its immigrants had left behind.  What social and political factors shaped America’s rise from an insignificant and remote 13 colonies to twentieth century prominence?  The American constitution, unprecedented economic growth and political power, immigration, slavery, the role of women, the rise of consumerism and two world wars all played a part in the rise of American power.  Only now in the twenty-first century is its leading position under challenge. These issues will be examined in this course.

HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY Ralph Blumenau
Tue 15.00 – 16.00 (Room 2.21).
From the 17th century Scientific Revolution to 18th century ‘philosophes’.

HISTORY: PALESTINE REDISCOVERED  New Naomi Shepherd
Wed 12.40 – 13.55 (Room 33) Spring and Summer terms only, fortnightly on Jan 11, 25; Feb 8, 22, Mar 8, 22; Apr 26. May 10, 24; June  7, 21;  July 5.
The Zealous Intruders.  After Napoleon’s defeat off the shores of Ottoman Palestine, political and cultural changes in the West revived interest in a country neglected since the Crusades. Explorers found classical remains; Protestants tried to authenticate the Bible; scholars competed with amateurs over ancient finds and fakes; Consuls gained a foothold; the Bedouin played politics; missionaries tried to convert the Jews of Palestine and modern tourism created the souvenir industry.

HISTORY: ENGLAND’S REVOLUTION 1640 – 1660 New  Pat MacDonald
Tue 12.40 – 13.45 (Room 2.21) Autumn Term only   
Civil war; regicide; a republic.  A time when the country in which you lived and the beliefs you held could determine your survival.  An examination of the political, religious and social background of the period and the men and women  who, through their letters and diaries, give a contemporary account of a “world turned upside down”.

HYPNOTHERAPY Adeline Kam
Tue 13.50-14:55 (Room 33)
Starts in April.